Wednesday, September 27, 2006

I love Beirut
I love Beirut … I am wholly and totally in love with this beautiful city …
It is a city that is beautiful in every way.
I love Beirut for its contradictions and its unity,
its simplicity and its glamour,
its noise and its quiet sunrise …

I love Beirut,
and I am sure that anyone who visits this city will feel the same …
You can never pinpoint what it is exactly that makes this city special …
is it its people? its streets? its sea? its loud nights?
You can never tell …
But what no one can ever deny is that there is a certain overwhelming feeling that this city has on its visitors that you never feel elsewhere …

I love the sunset in Beirut,
watching the sun dip into the sea at Raouche is a true experience …
I also love the sunrise in Beirut,
watching the sun rise over the city as we are heading back home from yet another loud night out …
I love the rain in Beirut,
one can almost swear it seeps into your soul and washes you clean …

Beirut is utterly amazing …
many, including myself, argue that it is the city’s beauty that has caused it so much suffering …
and as the famous song by Majida el-Roumi eloquently put it:

Beirut, the Mistress of the World
We confess before the One God
That we were envious of you
That your beauty hurt us
We confess now

Beirut, the Mistress of the World
We confess before the One God
That we were envious of you
That your beauty hurt us
We confess now
That we've maltreated and misunderstood you
And we had no mercy and didn't excuse you
And we offered you a dagger in place of flowers!
We confess before the fair God
That we injured you, alas; we tired you
That we vexed you and made you cry
And we burdened you with our insurrections
O Beirut
The world without you won't suffice us
We now realize your roots are deep inside us,
We now realize what offence we've perpetrated
Rise from under the rubble
Like a flower of Almond in April
Get over your sorrow
Since revolution grows in the wounds of grief
Rise in honor of the forests,
Rise in honor of the rivers
Rise in honor of humankind
Rise, O Beirut!
Whenever I say repentance, destinies give up on me
I miss his black eyes and melt of longing.
He is away and the nights never leave me alone;
And I lost the eyelash which used to hurt me; why should I care?
O eyelashes that kill and hurt
O eyes that sleep and wander
I would give u my whole life if you would give me happiness.
Songs withered in the green heart
And as long as you are away, it can't drink from another sea.

By: Alia Bader

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

On the corner of 23rd and 2nd Ave. New York, NY., 08/06

Monday, September 04, 2006

Glamcult Magazine
www.glamcult.com
Please see Tanya Traboulsi's article inside "Last Days of Beirut"

Monday, August 21, 2006

•Please find the time to answer the following question:
(This is a really open exercise and we really encourage you to take it in the direction that you feel comfortable with. Please also feel free to answer the question in any medium or manner that you wish (i.e. text, image, sound etc.)

WHY DO YOU LOVE BEIRUT?

Note* for those who would rather write about Lebanon itself or a different city or town or village in Lebanon please do so.

We really believe that our testimonies of love for Beirut/Lebanon will be a wonderful way to express our thoughts on what is happening, and let's face it talk of love is generally well received. It may also be a wonderful exercise for us to remain strong united and sane. Please take time and write a few sentences for us or send us your creations we have wonderful plans for all of your thoughts and really think it's a great follow-up to the stickers.

•••••Please Email us your statements at thelebanonchronicle@gmail.com, or post your comments and we will publish them
Anonymous:

I love Beirut .

I love Beirut for its opposites.
I love Beirut because I see a girl in a Mini skirt and her sister in a Tchador.
I love Beirut because it is neither West nor East it is both.
I love Beirut because one can party till 6 in the morning and not realize that it is Wednesday morning.
I love Beirut because Beirut is live as if they are going to die tomorrow and party as if they are going to live forever.
I love Beirut because I can be swimming in the morning and 30 minutes later I'm on the slopes skiing or doing after ski.
I love Beirut because I have never seen the sun this strong anywhere in the world.
I love Beirut because I can see 6,000 years of history & civilization.
I love Beirut because Christians and Muslims are living an understanding and do not need to have Christian Muslim understanding
classes.
I love Beirut because every Beiruti has a political opinion and will share it with you even if you could care less about his and
you want to share yours with him.
I love Beirut for all the conspiracy theories and how people actually believe them.
I love Beirut because any night I can find a friend to go out with.
I love Beirut because I do not need to call my friends to go and see them at their houses I just stop by.
I love Beirut because as soon as I arrive at one of my friends houses his mom takes me to the kitchen & becomes the
spokesperson of the refrigerator.
I love Beirut because one can smell gardenia, and jasmine.
I love Beirut because strawberries taste like strawberries & fruits taste like fruits.
I love Beirut because the food is so good that one gains so many pounds even if he/she tries to loose .
I love Beirut because although the Lebanese women at times look alike as some did their surgeries at the same plastic surgeon they
are the most elegant women I have ever seen.
I love Beirut because when I go out at night I don't know at which women to look at as each one is gorgeous in her own way.
I love Beirut because everyone knows me by name.
I love Beirut because I don't have to explain myself.
I love Beirut because of the traffic jams and the people you meet because of them.
I love Beirut because of the noise pollution from cars honking.
I love Beirut for the spirituality of the people wether Muslim or Christian.
I love Beirut because I'm the first to call my Christian friends on Christmas and my Muslim friends on Ramadan and vice versa.
I love Beirut because on May 1st I see Muslims visiting Harissa (Virgin Mary) just like I see Christians.
I love Beirut because we can differentiate between civilians and Militants.
I love Beirut because we respect all divine religions including Judaism. I love Beirut
because on the 22nd of every month I see Muslims going to St.Charbel church and believing that a miracle will happen.
I love Beirut because women look like as if they are out of a Vogue magazine.
I love Beirut because you eat to live and live to eat.
I love Beirut because one leaves one cafe to go to another and one does this all day.
I love Beirut because all the Lebanese living outside want to come back and the Lebanese who are in Lebanon envy the ones who are
living abroad not realizing what it means to live away from Beirut.
I love Beirut because a girl or a guy can easily tell you I just had a couple of Lexo or Xanax as if they just had a chewing gum.

I love Beirut because for every Lebanese we have a singer.
I love Beirut because the Lebanese star singers sing in nightclubs.
I love Beirut because women go into the swimming pool with full make up.
I love Beirut because guys go in with their cigars.
I love Beirut because it has been destroyed 7 times in History and has risen.
I love Beirut because since 1975 the Beirutis have withstood the PLO , Syrians and the Israelis.
I love Beirut because the Beirutis will not accept anyone to occupy them and rule over them.
I love Beirut because we feel that it is better to die standing than to live on our knees.
I love Beirut because each street is a two ways street even if it is a one way officially.
I love Beirut because one can park anywhere and not get a ticket.
I love Beirut because one can go as fast as his speedometer.
I love Beirut because MEA lands there.
I love Beirut because on MEA we can clap in unison when we are about to land.
I love Beirut not because it is my city, but because it is the city of Everyone.
I love Beirut because it welcomes every exile freethinker, independent mind of the Arab world.
I love Beirut because we have hundreds of newspapers and our press is finally Free.
I love Beirut because most wonderful people in the world dream of coming to Beirut and wish his capital to be more like Beirut.
I love Beirut because when I explain Beirut to my Western friends, my friends see the passion of Beirut in my eyes.
I love Beirut because there is so much misconception about Beirut in the media and in the minds of people who have never visited.

I love Beirut because when I tell my friends that I'm going to Beirut they reply:
"can you take me with you" or "Lucky you!".
I love Beirut because we argue over who is going to pay the bill at a restaurant as everyone wants to pay it.
I love Beirut because although many complain about "not making enough money" everyone is living.
I love Beirut because we accept our differences as we disagree with each other.
I love Beirut because it serves as a beacon of freedom to the rest of the Arab world.
I love Beirut because to paraphrase what Khalil Gibran said about Lebanon:
"Had Beirut not been my city I would have chosen it to be."

I love Beirut because there is no city like it.
I love Beirut because even if Beirut is being destroyed you are still beautiful and will remain beautiful no matter how disfigured
you are.
I love Beirut because you are always on my mind.
I love Beirut for no reason. I love Beirut for all the reasons of the "world".

OH Beirut, How much I miss you !!!!!!!

God bless you all...
*From Serge
•Please find the time to answer the following question:
(This is a really open exercise and we really encourage you to take it in the direction that you feel comfortable with. Please also feel free to answer the question in any medium or manner that you wish (i.e. text, image, sound etc.)

WHY DO YOU LOVE BEIRUT?

Note* for those who would rather write about Lebanon itself or a different city or town or village in Lebanon please do so.

We really believe that our testimonies of love for Beirut/Lebanon will be a wonderful way to express our thoughts on what is happening, and let's face it talk of love is generally well received. It may also be a wonderful exercise for us to remain strong united and sane. Please take time and write a few sentences for us or send us your creations we have wonderful plans for all of your thoughts and really think it's a great follow-up to the stickers.

•••••Please Email us your statements at thelebanonchronicle@gmail.com, or post your comments and we will publish them

ببيروت
My passion for Beirut, in words:

ببيروت، في شي هيك... عالق بالهوا، مطبوع عحيطان الزّواريب، عم بينقّط نقطة نقطة من وراق الشّجر بعد ما يخلص الشّتي بشوي.

في شي بيخلّي رفيقي الأجنبي يصير يفوت عكس السير، ويقطع عالإشارة الحمرا، ويسوق متل المجنون. شي بيخلّيه يخبّرني عن مطارح ما كنت شايفتها وألوان ما كنت أعرف إقراها. بيصير يعرف الفرق بين المجدّرة والمدردرة*، ويبلّش يحكي سياسة، ويحبّ فيروز مع إنّو ما عم يفهم ولا كلمة. بيصير يعمّر بيت بالجبل، حتّى يقضّي هونيك بقية الصّيفية. وأوقات كتير بينسى حاله وبيقول: "نحنا اللبنانيّي مش رح نتعلّم أبداً..."
ببيروت، في شي بخلّيه يحبّها أكتر منّي...

في طريق هروب دايماً بتودّيك عالبحر. وفي كاميرات عطول عم بتصوّر، من خوفها الخيالي لتنسى العين، ويشرد القلب. في طريق معمولة بس حتّى تحمل حلمك، إنت وعم تمشي، ما بتعرف لوين. في شي بالعيون متل السّؤال، متل البنايات العتيقة، متل نظرة بدها تْفِلّ، متل الخراب.

ببيروت، في سرّ ما بتعرفه إلا إذا جرّيت شنطك قدّامك، شي مرّة، بالمطار... وعاشرت المدن الصَبيّة، واحدة ورا التّانية، وضلّيتك عطول تحنّ لهيدي المدينة الوحشيّة، مطرح ما "الفرق بين الظّلمة والنّور، كلمة"... واشتقت لهيديك الفوضى محلّ ما السيارات بتطلع عالرصيف والنّاس بيتمشوا بنصّ الطرقات... وبقيت، مهما بعدت، محرور بحمّى مدينة، بتعرف إنّك مش ناوي تشفى منها.

في شي أكبر منّي. وأكبر منّك. في نيسان بعمره ما بيخلص. ومطرح كلّ ما بتضيع، وبتوقع، وتتوجّع، بترجع توشوش بحروف اسمه من أوّل وجديد

Another great work from MysteriousEve

Wednesday, August 16, 2006

Chicago







**Sent to us by Shayna
lebanon, israel, bicycles, rally, los angeles........

**Photographer Natascha Unkart
http://natascha.dehors.net
There are many reasons why I love Beirut, the city where I immediately felt at home.

I love the repeating clicking sound that the falafal guy makes at Barbar.
I love "Hi, keefak, ça va?"
I love watching children play at Rouche.
I love watching pretty girls from the bench in front of Coffee Shop.
I love the smell of fresh air at la Centrale when the roof opens up.
I love buying books at the Librarie Orientale and Antoine in Hamra.
I love the cats at AUB.
I love eating ice cream on Bliss Street.
I love watching girls in high heels climb the high hill to get to LAU.
I love the Corniche on a Saturday afternoon.
I love getting caught staring by pretty girls at De Prague.
I love complaining about the salt water pool at St. George.
I love ordering "wahad manouche, y'anni cocktail, jibneh ou zataar, please."
I love chatting about the monidale while taking a service.
I love drinking root beer, which I can't find in France.
I love rue Monot during the day.
I love that I can have anything delivered and everyone knows where New Perfect Home is.
I love eating Dunkin Donuts and reading the newspaper.
I love the Visit Palestine poster at Barometre.
I love complaining about the way downtown was redone.
I love saying "buzzle" and "blease."
I love learning a Sierran folk song from a Lebanese friend.
I love that I get teased for using fus-ha.
I love Lebanese girls giving me butterflies in my stomach.
I love my friends.

I love you, Beirut, and I miss you terribly already.

With love and squalor,
Sean

Tuesday, August 15, 2006

Why do we love Beirut?
Café Rawda: sit there, stare at the sea, enjoy.

Stefanie most loves what she calles the blue hour: after sunset but before dusk at café Rawda.

Cordelia loves the smell (even if sometimes its hard to stand) and the undescribable atmosphere - attractive, comforting, full of promises. Most of all, I miss the light. It is different from other (european) cities: bright and clear but warm, somehow filled with density. 1 Million call for prayers at the same time in a cacophonie that in itself becomes beauty.

Now, we stop here; otherwise, it won't end.

Stefanie and Cordelia

By Randa Mirza
www.randamirza.com
Spring is beautiful everywhere, but it is most beautiful in Lebanon. It is a spirit that roams round the earth but hovers over Lebanon, conversing with kings and prophets, singing with the rives the songs of Solomon, and repeating with the Holy Cedars of Lebanon the memory of ancient glory. Beirut, free from the mud of winter and the dust of summer, is like a bride in the spring, or like a mermaid sitting by the side of a brook drying her smooth skin in the rays of the sun.

K. Gibran - from Broken Wings

Sent to us by Christopher Leadley
I was born in beirut in 1970. My family left soon after the war began and I haven't been back in over 20 years. I was planning on visiting with my two year old son but the plans were aborted when the fighting began.

We're in Montreal and many of us here are flying the cedar flag on our cars to remind everyone of what's going on.

I'm enclosing a picture of my son with the flag.

I'm a writer and have begun a series of short stories on the Lebanon I remember if you would be inerested... I've never written about my country before but recent events have broght forth a torrent of memories...

I hope to return home soon and show my son where his people hail from.

Sincerely,
MZ

Monday, August 14, 2006

In Beirut

In Beirut,
there’s something, like that, just like that…
Stuck in the air, printed on the walls of small roads,
Dripping little by little from the trees right after the rain…

There’s something that makes my foreign friend drive recklessly and ignore the traffic lights. Something that makes him tell me about some of our places. Places that I haven’t had the chance to see and colors I couldn’t understand. He starts understanding the difference between mjadarra and mdardara, he starts talking politics, he loves Fairuz even when he doesn’t understand a word she says. He starts building a house in the mountain, where he would spend the rest of the summer. And sometimes, so many times, he would get carried away and say: “Us Lebanese will never learn…”

In Beirut,
there’s something that makes him love her more than i do…
There’s always a shortcut road that takes you to the sea. There are always cameras taking pictures, fearing that the eye would forget, fearing that the heart would drift…
There’s a road built just to carry your dream, while you walk, not knowing where.
There’s something in people’s eyes, like a question, like the old buildings, like an escaping look, like the ruin.

In Beirut,
there’s a secret that you don’t know until you’re at the airport with your bag… until you’re estranged stranded in young cities, one after the other, forever longing to your crude city, the city where “the difference between the darkness and the light is one word”… And you miss the familiar chaos where the cars park on sidewalks and people strut in the middle of the streets… And forever, for as much as you hide away, you’re haunted with the fever of Beirut, and you know the illness is part of you and you know that she will never leave you.

In Beirut,
There’s something bigger than me, and bigger than you. There’s an April that never ends. And a place, a place that, whenever you lose yourself, whenever you fall, whenever you hurt, you come back whispering the letters of its name once anew, in Beirut.

In Beirut, there’s something, like that, just like that…
Stuck in the air, printed on the walls of small roads,
Dripping from the trees after the rain…


Eve


**For an audio version click here.
Beyrouth,avec ses femmes de dolce vita et ses femmes voilées,
Beyrouth aux mille contrastes et contradictions inexpliqués,
Beyrouth de mon enfance, de ma jeunesse,
Beyrouth martyr et otage, soudainement unifiée
Puisse le printemps de Beyrouth revivre malgré la sauvagerie des "nouveaux barbares"

Amale Akiki Khoury